Nigerian presidential candidate checks in to Trump's hotel

Welcome to 1100 Pennsylvania, a newsletter devoted to President Donald Trump’s Trump International Hotel Washington, D.C. (and his other companies). President Trump, of course, still owns his businesses and can profit from them.

Subscribe now

If you like what you see, tell someone—and support this work by paying for a subscription. If you’ve been forwarded this newsletter, subscribe for yourself at zacheverson.substack.com. Questions? Read our FAQ/manifesto. Tips or feedback? Contact me, Zach Everson, securely via email at z_everson@protonmail.com or on Signal at 703.919.8018.

Nigerian presidential candidate checks into U.S. president’s hotel

With one month to go before Nigeria’s general election, Atiku Abubakarone of two main candidates for the top job in the world’s seventh most-populous country—checked into the Trump Hotel D.C. with his entourage yesterday.

The hotel’s managing director, Mickael Damelincourt, is seen greeting Abubakar, who served as Nigeria’s vice president from 1999 through 2007. Atiku, in his fourth presidential campaign, is considered the underdog to the incumbent, President Muhammadu Buhari, in February’s general election.

Abubakar’s ability to visit the United States appears to be an election issue in Nigeria, with Kanyi Daily reporting that, “The [Nigeria] Federal Government and the ruling APC had claimed Atiku would never be able to enter the U.S. over money laundering allegations hanging on his neck.” In 2006, Abubakar was connected to a corruption investigation that felled then Rep. William J. Jefferson (D-La.).

Your correspondent can verify the authenticity of the video as I was at the hotel when Abubakar arrived—and watched him head to the elevators, which require a room key to use.

According to Abubakar’s verified Twitter account, he is in D.C. to meet with U.S. government officials, Nigerians living in the area, and the business community.” He was accompanied on this trip by Nigeria’s senate president, Bukola Saraki, and Nigerian senator Ben Bruce. It’s not clear if they too stayed at the U.S. president’s hotel.

One of the Nigerian lawmakers meetings was with U.S. Rep. Chris Smith (R–N.J.).

Kanyi Daily reports that Abubakar is addressing the U.S. Chamber of Commerce today and will be in the country though Saturday.

Mike Pence returns to his boss’s hotel to address black-tie, pro-life gala

Last night vice president Mike Pence and his wife Karen made an unadvertised appearance at the sold-out, black-tie, pro-life Save the Storks Ball, held in the hotel’s presidential ballroom.

Grammy-award winning singer, Joy Villa, attended (and hung out in the hotel’s lobby beforehand) and shared this video of Pence’s remarks. Pence passed along greetings from the U.S. president and hotel owner.

Other notable Save the Stork guests included

CREW finds 1,400 conflicts of interest involving Trump properties

“During President Trump’s second year in office, CREW [Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington] recorded more than 900 interactions between the government, those trying to influence it, and the Trump Organization, each resulting in a conflict of interest for President Trump,” according to a report the government watchdog published yesterday.

“Those instances bring the total number of known conflicts of interest involving the Trump Organization to more than 1,400, two years into the Trump administration.”

CREW is the plaintiff in one emoluments lawsuit against President Trump and is serving as co-counsel in the D.C. and Maryland attorneys general’s suit.

Key findings from the report:

  • At least “12 foreign governments that have made payments to Trump properties during his first two years in office.”

  • 53 U.S. senators and representatives made more than 90 visits to Trump properties during his second year in office.”

  • “More than 150 political committees, including campaigns and party committees, have spent nearly $5 million at Trump businesses.”

  • “Over the past year, President Trump made 118 visits to properties he still profits from in office, bringing his two-year total to 281 visits.”

  • President Trump attended 13 political events that were held at his properties during his second year in office and dropped by to greet attendees at a fourteenth. Vice President Pence attended nine political events at Trump properties over this period.”

CREW cited my work as one of its main sources. Please support independent journalism, pay for your 1100 Pennsylvania subscription.

House committee chair threatens GSA with subpoena over lease info

From “DeFazio warns he can subpoena GSA for answers on Trump hotel by Andrew Desiderio and John Bresnahan for Politico:

The new chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee warned Thursday he could subpoena the General Services Administration if it doesn’t provide information about the Trump International Hotel’s lease of the Old Post Office building in Washington.

Rep. Peter DeFazio (D-Ore.) said in an interview that he wants the GSA to answer questions after an inspector general report released Wednesday found that agency lawyers ignored constitutional concerns about President Donald Trump’s possible conflicts of interest when it allowed the luxury hotel to keep its lease after Trump was sworn in.

Other noteworthy sightings

This guest got a handshake from Rudy Giuliani.

A reliable source reports former chief of staff Reince Preibus dined again at BLT Prime last night. (Politico Playbook spotted Preibus there last week with acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney.)

Legal cases, current status (latest change, Jan. 11, 2018)

Health inspections, current status (latest change, Aug. 10, 2018)

  • ❌Hotel: five violations on May 7, 2018; two were corrected on site

  • ❌BLT Prime and Benjamin Bar: nine violations on Aug. 10, 2018

  • ❌Sushi Nakazawa: two violations on Aug. 10, 2018

  • ✔️Banquet kitchen: no violations on Aug. 10, 2018

  • ❌Pastry kitchen: two violations on Aug. 10, 2018

  • ✔️Gift shop: no violations on May 7, 2018

  • ❌Employee kitchen and in-room dining: five violations on Aug. 10, 2018; two were corrected on site

Other Trump Organization news

One thing that has nothing to do with Trump’s businesses (I think, tough to tell sometimes!)

“How secrecy fuels Facebook Paranoiaby John Herrman for The New York Times

Thanks for reading. If you like what you saw, tell someone—and support this work by paying for a subscription. If you’ve been forwarded this newsletter, subscribe for yourself at zacheverson.substack.com. Questions? Read our FAQ/manifesto. Tips or feedback? Contact me, Zach Everson, securely via email at z_everson@protonmail.com or on Signal at 703.919.8018.

Subscribe now

IG: GSA failed to consider if hotel's lease violated Constitution

Welcome to 1100 Pennsylvania, a newsletter devoted to President Donald Trump’s Trump International Hotel Washington, D.C. (and his other companies). President Trump, of course, still owns his businesses and can profit from them.

Subscribe now

If you like what you see, tell someone—and support this work by paying for a subscription. If you’ve been forwarded this newsletter, subscribe for yourself at zacheverson.substack.com. Questions? Read our FAQ/manifesto. Tips or feedback? Contact me, Zach Everson, securely via email at z_everson@protonmail.com or on Signal at 703.919.8018.

IG: GSA failed to consider if Trump Hotel D.C. lease violated Emoluments Clauses

Yesterday the General Services Administration’s inspector general criticized GSA for failing to consider if the Trump Hotel D.C.’s lease was in compliance with the U.S. Constitution after Donald Trump became president. The report recommended GSA conduct a “formal legal review” that considers the foreign and domestic emoluments clauses.

From the report’s conclusion:

We found that GSA…recognized that the President’s business interest in the OPO [Old Post Office] lease raised issues under the Constitution’s Emoluments Clauses that might cause a breach of the lease, but decided not to address those issues in connection with the management of the lease. We also found that OGC [GSA’s Office of General Counsel] improperly ignored these Emoluments Clauses, even though the lease itself requires compliance with the laws of the United States, including the Constitution.

The report makes clear that its purpose was not to determine if Trump’s election caused him to be in violation of section 37.19 of the lease (which precludes elected officials from having any share of it) or if his interest in the hotel violated the Emoluments Clauses. Rather the IG “sought to determine whether there were any improprieties in GSA’s decision-making process regarding these issues.”

But yet!

After a six-page analysis of emoluments the IG concludes:

In sum, we found evidence that the term ‘emolument’ as used historically and today includes the gain from private business activities. As noted above, if emoluments include an official’s gains from private business activities, the President’s interest in the lease raises potential constitutional issues.

Here’s an overview of GSA’s decision-making process:

Contracting officer Kevin Terry is the GSA official who decided that the hotel was not in violation of its lease. According to the IG, Terry “was aware of Trump’s earlier interest in the presidency but it was not a consideration during lease negotiations [which occurred in 2012–2013] because at the time Terry thought a Trump presidency unlikely.” Fair enough.

According to the IG report, after the Trump presidency became definite though, Terry did not consider the Emoluments Clauses’ affect on the validity of the lease because “they were not included within the ‘four corners of the lease’” and he thought they were an issue for the courts to consider.

As for section 37.19, variations of it were used on previous government leases (for The Willard Hotel and The Hotel Monaco in D.C.). Additionally, “GSA did not consider Section 37.19 a material term of the OPO lease, and it was not discussed during lease negotiations,” per the IG report. After Trump’s election—and media outlets pointed out that he could now be in violation of the lease [support journalism!]—GSA attorneys started reviewing the lease. Terry, meanwhile “immediately formed an opinion, based on his ‘plain reading’ of Section 37.19, that there was no breach.”

Terry also told that IG that in a meeting with Trump Organization EVPs Donald Trump Jr. and Eric Trump shortly after their father was inaugurated, Terry “pushed hard” for the president to divest the property—not because his ownership (now through a revocable trust from which he can profit) violated the lease, but rather for appearances. “However, Terry stated he did not have a solid position to force a complete divestiture since there was not a breach of the lease,” according to the report.

Three weeks later, Terry asked the Trump Organization to provide him with an opinion of whether or not it was in compliance with the lease. Its attorney replied, we good. Terry sought guidance from GSA’s attorneys as well. They replied, but it’s redacted from the report. On March 23, 2017, Terry told the Trump Org, it was in compliance.

Read the entire evaluation.

Government officials, watchdogs respond to GSA IG’s report

Rep. Elijah E. Cummings (D–MD), the chairman of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform (when in the minority, Democrats on the committee had unsuccessfully sued GSA for its communications about the lease with the Trump transition team):

“President Trump should not have any contracts with the federal government. It is an obvious conflict of interest, and it is why the lease for the Trump Hotel in Washington D.C. explicitly prohibits any federal government official from being a party. This devastating new report from the Inspector General is proof that President Trump should have divested his business interests rather than ignoring the advice of ethics experts. According to this report, GSA’s own lawyers recognized that President Trump’s interest in the Trump Hotel raised concerns under the Emoluments Clause of the Constitution and under the lease itself, but ‘punted rather than addressing them. I have been trying for years to get documents from GSA related to this issue, but they have refused to provide them, preferring instead to litigate the matter. The Trump Hotel is a glaring physical symbol of the Trump Administration’s refusal to play by the same rules as everyone else.”

Maryland attorney general Brian Frosch, who’s suing the president for violating the emoluments clauses:

Noah Bookbinder, a former federal prosecutor and the executive director of Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW), involved in two emoluments cases against President Trump:

Fordham law professor Jed Shugerman, who filed an amicus brief in CREWs emoluments lawsuit v. President Trump:

Former director of the Office of Government Ethics, Walter Shaub, shares his role in the process:

Executive editor of Lawfare, Susan Hennessey:

T-Mobile CEO responds to Washington Post article

Yesterday The Washington Post published Jonathan O'Connell and David A. Fahrenthold’s scoop, “T-Mobile announced a merger needing Trump administration approval. The next day, 9 executives had reservations at Trump’s hotel.”

T-Mobile CEO John Legere, one of the aforementioned executives, tweeted this response:

Don Jr. goes out of his way to praise Congressman who goes out of his way to visit Trump properties

Trump Organization EVP and son of the president Donald Trump Jr. yesterday:

Then Rep.-elect Dan Crenshaw (R–TX) at the Trump Hotel D.C. on Dec. 2:

Then Rep. elect Crenshaw at Mar-a-Lago on Dec. 24:

Noteworthy sightings

Yesterday President Trump’s personal attorney Rudy Giuliani met with Italian member of parliament and deputy minister for foreign affairs, Guglielmo Picchi. They discussed a potential visit to Florence. (Picchi was scheduled to be on Fox Business’s Varney & Co. this morning too.)

Reps of the pro-wall American Border Foundation are at the hotel, prepping for a press event.

Legal cases, current status (latest change, Jan. 11, 2018)

T-Mobile execs book Trump's hotel

Welcome to 1100 Pennsylvania, a newsletter devoted to President Donald Trump’s Trump International Hotel Washington, D.C. (and his other companies). President Trump, of course, still owns his businesses and can profit from them.

Subscribe now

If you like what you see, tell someone—and support this work by paying for a subscription. If you’ve been forwarded this newsletter, subscribe for yourself at zacheverson.substack.com. Questions? Read our FAQ/manifesto. Tips or feedback? Contact me, Zach Everson, securely via email at z_everson@protonmail.com or on Signal at 703.919.8018.

T-Mobile execs book Trump's hotel: Thoughts on and reactions to today’s Post scoop

From “T-Mobile announced a merger needing Trump administration approval. The next day, 9 executives had reservations at Trump’s hotel.” By Jonathan O'Connell and David A. Fahrenthold for The Washington Post:

Last April, telecom giant T-Mobile announced a megadeal: a $26 billion merger with rival Sprint, which would more than double T-Mobile’s value and give it a huge new chunk of the cellphone market.

But for T-Mobile, one hurdle remained: Its deal needed approval from the Trump administration.

The next day, in Washington, staffers at the Trump International Hotel were handed a list of incoming “VIP Arrivals.” That day’s list included nine of T-Mobile’s top executives — including its chief operating officer, chief technology officer, chief strategy officer, chief financial officer and its outspoken celebrity chief executive, John Legere…Legere appears to have made at least four visits to the Trump hotel, walking the lobby in his T-Mobile gear.

Some thoughts and observations:

1. Here’s Legere at the hotel the day after T-Mobile and Sprint announced their merger

The picture is no longer available on Facebook, but I shared a screenshot of it back when it was posted on April 30, 2018:

2. Legere attended a networking event for lobbyists at the hotel

Trump First Tuesdays is a monthly “business networking happy hour for government relations professionals and friends.” Whether he intended to or not, Legere was a guest at the one in May 2018.

3. Legere popped up in so many photos around May 8, 2018, that it merited a collage

Between his standard flashy attire and many, many promoted tweets, it’s clear Legere wants to be noticed in general. But it was hard not to see this onslaught of pics and think, this is a man who wants it to be known that he’s patronizing the president’s hotel.

4. More details about Lewandowski and Legere

From The Post’s article:

On June 27, the same day that Legere testified to Congress about the merger, he was spotted at the hotel by independent journalist Zach Everson, according to an account Everson posted on Twitter. Everson said he saw Legere in the hotel lobby, talking to former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski, who has advised T-Mobile during the merger talks.

After chatting with Lewandowski, Legere walked over to the hotel’s elevators, which required a room key to use. So it seems likely he was not just hanging out at the hotel’s lobby bar, but rather was staying there again too.

5. Additional Post stories about Trump Hotel D.C. guests may be forthcoming

From the article:

The VIP Arrivals lists obtained by The Post — in which Trump hotel executives alerted their staff to foreign officials, corporate executives, long-term guests, Trump family friends and big spenders—provide an inside look at some of the hotel’s customers. The Post obtained lists for about a dozen days in 2018.

6. The Trump Hotel D.C. researches its guests before they arrive

Regarding the hotel’s use of a VIP arrivals list, when I checked into the Trump Hotel D.C. in April 2017, within moments of reaching the desk, two senior managers greeted me, offering business cards. It was a welcome that made it clear to me that the hotel knew I was a journalist, possibly on assignment (I was!).

The hotel’s managing director, Mickael Damelincourt, later explained that the hotel’s attaché department researches each day’s arrivals in advance (including looking at their social media accounts), to help ensure guests have a comfortable stay. Not said by Damelincourt, but probably also true: the hotel wants to know how to manage its guests for its own purposes too. (Which explains that complimentary glass of Veuve Clicquot I was poured.)

7. That hotel staffers are leaking to The Post may explain this tweet from the hotel’s managing director

Damelincourt on Jan. 8, 2018:

8. Government officials, watchdogs, attorneys react to today’s story

FCC commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel:

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D–CT), who is the lead plaintiff in an emoluments suit against Trump brought by 196 Democratic members of the Senate and House:

Walter Shaub, a former director of the U.S. Office of Government Ethics and currently a senior advisor for the Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (involved in two emoluments suits against the president):

Scott Rome of Vertias Law, which is representing Cork in its unfair competition lawsuit against the president and his D.C. hotel:

As for Legere, he having a snowball fight—which seems like a great way to not be checking your Twitter mentions:

Inauguration accounted for 17 percent of hotel’s revenue in January and February 2017

Forbes’s Dan Alexander did the math:

Nunes dismisses Daily Beast report that Mueller is investigating his breakfast meeting at hotel

From “Nunes: Daily Beast report on Trump hotel breakfast meeting is ‘fake news’” on The Daily Beast:

Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA) dismissed a Daily Beast report about Special Counsel Robert Mueller looking into a 2017 meeting he attended along with former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn and foreign officials as a “fake news story” on Tuesday. “It’s always another day, they do another fake news story. I don’t even know what they’re talking about,” Nunes told Fox & Friends. “The fact that I’m holding meetings with ambassadors—you can have at it, because I do it every day,” he said.

Noteworthy sighting

An editorial producer for CNN’s “State of the Union with Jake Tapper,” Cassie McNamara, was transported back to Japan for an evening at Sushi Nakazawa.

Legal cases, current status (latest change, Jan. 11, 2018)

Health inspections, current status (latest change, Aug. 10, 2018)

  • ❌Hotel: five violations on May 7, 2018; two were corrected on site

  • ❌BLT Prime and Benjamin Bar: nine violations on Aug. 10, 2018

  • ❌Sushi Nakazawa: two violations on Aug. 10, 2018

  • ✔️Banquet kitchen: no violations on Aug. 10, 2018

  • ❌Pastry kitchen: two violations on Aug. 10, 2018

  • ✔️Gift shop: no violations on May 7, 2018

  • ❌Employee kitchen and in-room dining: five violations on Aug. 10, 2018; two were corrected on site

Other Trump Organization news

One thing that has nothing to do with Trump’s businesses (I think, tough to tell sometimes!)

Thanks for reading. If you like what you saw, tell someone—and support this work by paying for a subscription. If you’ve been forwarded this newsletter, subscribe for yourself at zacheverson.substack.com. Questions? Read our FAQ/manifesto. Tips or feedback? Contact me, Zach Everson, securely via email at z_everson@protonmail.com or on Signal at 703.919.8018.

Subscribe now

Report: Trump Org paid Indonesian regency past-due $495,000

Welcome to 1100 Pennsylvania, a newsletter devoted to President Donald Trump’s Trump International Hotel Washington, D.C. (and his other companies). President Trump, of course, still owns his businesses and can profit from them.

Subscribe now

If you like what you see, tell someone—and support this work by paying for a subscription. If you’ve been forwarded this newsletter, subscribe for yourself at zacheverson.substack.com. Questions? Read our FAQ/manifesto. Tips or feedback? Contact me, Zach Everson, securely via email at z_everson@protonmail.com or on Signal at 703.919.8018.

Report: Trump Organization paid Indonesian regency past-due $495,000

A regency on Bali received almost $495,000 from the Trump Organization last month per The Seminyak Times, an English-language outlet serving Bali’s expat community.

According to that article, the funds were for a past-due balance on a building permit that the U.S. president’s company owed the regency of Tabanan regarding the Trump International Hotel and Tower Bali. The head of Tabanan’s permitting board, I Made Sumerta Yasa, told The Seminyak Times that there was a dispute over the payment, with the Trump Organization wanting to pay in installments but regulations requiring the funds all at once.

Tabanan reportedly received the IDR 7 billion ($494,345.05 per today’s exchange rate) on Dec. 28, 2018 for a payment due in March 2018. This transaction does not appear to have been previously reported in U.S. media.

“At least this payment will save our financial crisis, because we have a deficit of more than Rp 51 billion,” Yasa told The Seminyak Times.

In August 2015, the Trump Organization signed an agreement with Indonesian billionaire Hary Tanoesoedibjo’s company to develop the cliff-top resort and golf course that would be the Trump’s first Asian resort. It’s not yet completed.

Trump Organization EVP Eric Trump and spokesperson Amanda Miller did not reply to a request for comment.

Mueller investigating Nunes, Flynn, and foreign officials’ breakfast meeting at hotel

From “Mueller probes an event with Nunes, Flynn, and foreign officials at Trump’s D.C. hotel” by Erin Banco, Asawin Suebsaeng, Betsy Woodruff, and Spencer Ackerman for The Daily Beast:

The Special Counsel’s Office and federal prosecutors in Manhattan are scrutinizing a meeting involving former House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes, one-time National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, and dozens of foreign officials, according to three sources familiar with the investigations.

The breakfast event, which was first reported by The Daily Sabah, a pro-government Turkish paper, took place at the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C. at 8.30 a.m. on Jan. 18, 2017—two days before President Donald Trump’s inauguration. About 60 people were invited, including diplomats from governments around the world, according to those same sources.

Mueller is also investigating Ukrainians spotted at the hotel around the inauguration, according to a New York Times report last week.

Trump’s inauguration spent more than $1.5 million at Trump’s hotel

From “At Trump’s inauguration, $10,000 for makeup and lots of room service” by Maggie Haberman, Sharon LaFraniere, and Ben Protess for The New York Times:

The Trump International Hotel was paid more than $1.5 million for services including the use of a ballroom, an “annex” and a space called the townhouse, according to records and people familiar with the payments.

Walter Shaub, a former director of the U.S. Office of Government Ethics and currently a senior advisor for the Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (involved in two emoluments suits against the president), has concerns about this arrangement:

The townhouse in question, by the way, is the Trump Townhouse (it’s the hotel’s sole townhouse, and the highest priced suite in the building).

Before Trump’s election, I reported for Fox News that the Trump Townhouse was part of a $500,000 inauguration package that included “dinner for 24 in the duplex suite’s dining room (with the opportunity to select dishes from favorite presidential meals of past inaugural galas), 24/7 car service and two round-trip first-class tickets from anywhere in the United States.”

Shortly before the inauguration, I followed up with the hotel’s director of sales and marketing, Patricia Tang, to see if anyone booked the package, as well as if the hotel was offering guests any special events or inaugural-themed gifts—which are standard in D.C. hotels during an inauguration weekend and are largely done to cultivate media coverage.

We have no comment at this time on any of the events, bookings or information regarding the inauguration week,” Tang wrote via email.

Two years later, guess we know why the hotel wasn’t eager for media attention.

Trump did not serve Clemson food from his hotel; Twitter noticed

Yesterday President Trump fed the Clemson football team fast food rather than have the meal catered by his hotel a few blocks away. Twitter had thoughts.

Noteworthy sighting

The head federal lobbyist for TECO Energy, Shannon Maher Bañaga, was thankful for friends and wine.

Legal cases, current status (latest change, Jan. 11, 2018)

Health inspections, current status (latest change, Aug. 10, 2018)

  • ❌Hotel: five violations on May 7, 2018; two were corrected on site

  • ❌BLT Prime and Benjamin Bar: nine violations on Aug. 10, 2018

  • ❌Sushi Nakazawa: two violations on Aug. 10, 2018

  • ✔️Banquet kitchen: no violations on Aug. 10, 2018

  • ❌Pastry kitchen: two violations on Aug. 10, 2018

  • ✔️Gift shop: no violations on May 7, 2018

  • ❌Employee kitchen and in-room dining: five violations on Aug. 10, 2018; two were corrected on site

Other Trump Organization news

  • Donald Trump sold a Manhattan condo for the first time in nearly two years last Tuesday, according to a Forbes review of property records. The president dealt an 11th-floor unit on the south end of Central Park for $2.15 million to an entity named Scotchview Associates LLC, which appears to be connected to a New Jersey developer.” By Dan Alexander for Forbes.

  • Trump’s nominee for attorney general, William Barr, testified to the Senate’s judiciary committee during his information hearing that he’s not familiar with the contents of emoluments clause.

  • “An insider from ‘The Apprentice’ on how the show made Donald Trump.” Patrick Radden Keefe talks with the show’s supervising producer, Jonathon Braun, for The New Yorker.

  • The Trump Hotel New York opened 22 years ago today.

One thing that has nothing to do with Trump’s businesses (I think, tough to tell sometimes!)

José Andrés was going to open a high-end restaurant on Pennsylvania Avenue, in the Trump Hotel, but backed out after then candidate Donald Trump called Mexicans “rapists.” Now Andrés is opening a food kitchen on Pennsylvania Avenue for furloughed government employees.

Thanks for reading. If you like what you saw, tell someone—and support this work by paying for a subscription. If you’ve been forwarded this newsletter, subscribe for yourself at zacheverson.substack.com. Questions? Read our FAQ/manifesto. Tips or feedback? Contact me, Zach Everson, securely via email at z_everson@protonmail.com or on Signal at 703.919.8018.

Subscribe now

Shutdown helps Trump set abstinence record

Welcome to 1100 Pennsylvania, a newsletter devoted to President Donald Trump’s Trump International Hotel Washington, D.C. (and his other companies). President Trump, of course, still owns his businesses and can profit from them.

Subscribe now

If you like what you see, tell someone—and support this work by paying for a subscription. If you’ve been forwarded this newsletter, subscribe for yourself at zacheverson.substack.com. Questions? Read our FAQ/manifesto. Tips or feedback? Contact me, Zach Everson, securely via email at z_everson@protonmail.com or on Signal at 703.919.8018.

Shutdown puts Trump in record drought of not visiting one of his properties

President Trump is currently in the midst of his longest stretch without visiting one of his properties since becoming president. Per 1100 Pennsylvania’s records, he last stepped foot in a Trump Organization business on Nov. 25—50 days ago—when he golfed at Palm Beach and left Mar-a-Lago after a Thanksgiving stay. (According to The New York Times, he visited an unspecified property on Dec. 1. He was in Argentina that day though, where the Trump Organization—despite trying—does not have any venues. So it’s not immediately clear what property The Times is referring to.)

Either way though, it’s a record.

The government shutdown, of course, scuppered Trump’s plans for a 16-day vacation at Mar-a-Lago, with golf outings to Trump Palm Beach, in late December and early January.

Senator asks GSA, Interior for info on decision to re-open Old Post Office tower during shutdown

On Thursday, Sen. Gary Peters (D–MI) sent a letter to the Department of the Interior and the General Services Administration seeking details about the decision to re-open the Old Post Office tower despite the government shutdown. The tower, of course, is in the same building as the president’s D.C. hotel.

Wrote Peters:

While GSA has authority to transfer funds to NPS under certain conditions, the lengths to which to your agencies have gone to open the tower facility within a Trump business enterprise have raised public concerns that the tower may be receiving special treatment, in light of a shutdown that has left 800,000 federal workers furloughed or working without pay and crippled our national parks.

Chicago hotel donates free meeting space to a security and law-enforcement study group

Trump’s Chicago hotel has donated free meeting rooms and parking spaces to the Chicago chapter of a security and law-enforcement professional group.

ASIS, “a worldwide organization dedicated to strengthening the global security landscape,” has scheduled 12 weekly study groups to help attendees pass its certified protection professional, professional certified investigator, and physical security professional exams. Those licensees “conveys to your peers, employees, and employer that you possess substantial, relevant experience as well as demonstrated and tested competence.”

According to study-group organizer, P.J. Jordan, classroom space previously had been donated by Axis Communications, the Chicago Police Academy, the Field Museum, the Illinois Holocaust Museum, and McDonald’s Hamburger University. “The meeting room space is large enough to accommodate 10 to 20 attendees,” Jordan wrote in an email.

Also, according to the group’s event page, “There is no cost for attendance or parking (**Unless the Secret Service secures our parking area for a last-minute POTUS project**).”

Jordan and the other contact listed on the event page, a Chicago Police Department sergeant, did not answer a question asking if there were any specific “last-minute POTUS projects” they were anticipating.

Flashback to Border Patrol Foundation dinner

With The Washington Post reporting that President Trump is trying to enlist Border Patrol agents in his political fight over the wall, let’s remember that the agents also have taken steps to ingratiate themselves with the president. In October 2018, the Border Patrol Foundation had its annual recognition dinner at the Trump Hotel D.C. From 2015 through 2017, the dinner was held across the street at the JW Marriott.

The CBP's commissioner, Kevin McAleenan, and deputy chief, Scott Luck, were the featured speakers at the president’s hotel.

Noteworthy sightings

A lobbyist for “U.S. and international corporations and other countries,” Edwina Rogers had dinner with “anonymous mystery guests” at the president’s hotel.

After discovering that God was alive on Capitol Hill, University Conservative staff writer Garrett Smith visited the president’s hotel with the director of Christian ministry Hope to the Hill, Nathan Kistler.

Hotel managing director, Mickael Dameincourt, made a gif to chastise travel bloggers looking for freebies. Well, at least those bloggers who hadn’t already mentioned his hotel.

Reportedly in town to watch her cousin sworn in as a U.S. Senator, this Trip Advisor reviewer loved her stay at the president’s hotel.

Russian Mix’s calendar of Russian Washington, D.C. events now includes the Virginia Women for Trump’s summit and gala.

Legal cases, current status (latest change, Jan. 11, 2018)

Health inspections, current status (latest change, Aug. 10, 2018)

  • ❌Hotel: five violations on May 7, 2018; two were corrected on site

  • ❌BLT Prime and Benjamin Bar: nine violations on Aug. 10, 2018

  • ❌Sushi Nakazawa: two violations on Aug. 10, 2018

  • ✔️Banquet kitchen: no violations on Aug. 10, 2018

  • ❌Pastry kitchen: two violations on Aug. 10, 2018

  • ✔️Gift shop: no violations on May 7, 2018

  • ❌Employee kitchen and in-room dining: five violations on Aug. 10, 2018; two were corrected on site

Other Trump Organization news

One thing that has nothing to do with Trump’s businesses (I think, tough to tell sometimes!

The son of Rudy Giuliani, Andrew Giuliani works in the White House as the public liaison to President Trump. The most recent account Andrew followed on Twitter: award-winning adult actress, Ella Hughes.

Thanks for reading. If you like what you saw, tell someone—and support this work by paying for a subscription. If you’ve been forwarded this newsletter, subscribe for yourself at zacheverson.substack.com. Questions? Read our FAQ/manifesto. Tips or feedback? Contact me, Zach Everson, securely via email at z_everson@protonmail.com or on Signal at 703.919.8018.

Subscribe now

Loading more posts…